University of Connecticut University of UC Title Fallback Connecticut

SEM Practicum Competencies

COMPETENCIES MENU FOR THREE SUMMERS STUDENTS

Name ___________________________________ Semester/Year of Enrollment _________ (#) = hourly value Please print this form and use it to determine which competencies you are choosing to do. Be sure your time allocation (__) equals 90 or more hours and these represent new skills for you.

A. Identification and Assessment Activities
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  1. Administer, score and interpret a creativity test. (2)
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  1. Complete a SRBCSS for a student. (1)
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  1. Find a non-achieving student who might/should be receiving SEM services. Complete a case study for this student. (3)
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  1. Interview a student for past accomplishments within and outside of the school setting. (2)
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  1. Develop a series of questions for students/parents who are concerned about the need for enrichment or acceleration services. (2)
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  1. Explain the rationale for the Talent Pool identification method. (2)
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  1. Outline and provide handouts for a workshop explaining the services a student receives in SEM. (3)
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  1. Administer and tally an interest inventory to one class. (3)
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  1. Complete a Compactor form for an elementary or secondary student. (2)
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  1. Locate five commercial pretests in a variety of subject areas. (2)
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  1. Use at least one technique other than pretesting to assess content mastery. (1)
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  1. Complete a Total Talent Portfolio form for a student with special emphasis on the Summary and Recommendations Session. (5)
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  1. Develop an original talent portfolio inventory. (4)
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  1. Score a Learning Styles Inventory for a student. (2)
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  1. Develop a scoring rubric for a performance or product. (2)
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  1. Develop and administer a program needs assessment instrument for parents or teachers. (6)
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  1. Develop and administer a parent inventory about their child’s interests or needs. (3)
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  1. Identify Talent Pool students using test scores or teacher nominations. (3)
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  1. Administer a group IQ test. (3)
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  1. Interview parents who nominate their child for the G/T program. (2)
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  1. Complete a class record sheet. (1)
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  1. Develop and explain Talent Pool class lists. (2)
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  1. Conduct an identification workshop for teachers using SRBCCS and computer test printouts. (3)
B. Type I Activities
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  1. Plan and carry out at least five schoolwide Type I activities based on student interests. Each Type I should include a Type I announcement, debriefing, and summary to teachers. (15)
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  1. Prepare a Type I Interest Center. (10)
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  1. Contact, prepare and schedule three classroom Type I speakers. (6)
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  1. Create a community resources inventory to identify potential enrichment speakers for a school or classroom. (8)
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  1. Administer and tally a community resources inventory to identify potential enrichment speakers for a school or classroom. (12)
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  1. Develop and conduct a Type I minicourse for interested students. (15)
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  1. Assist a child in completing a self-directed, self-selected Type I project. (5)
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  1. Use a videotape presentation as a Type I format. (1)
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  1. Identify a set of three books that have an appropriate format for use in Type I activities. (4)
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  1. Make a collection of catalogs for local film libraries and other sources for AV materials. (3)
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  1. Choose appropriate library books for Type I resources. Make a bibliography of at least 20 books for a specific grade level. (5)
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  1. Organize a Type I Committee in your school. (30)
C. Type II Activities
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  1. Evaluate the quality of three Type II commercial materials. (3)
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  1. Fill out a specification sheet on two “how to” books. (2)
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  1. Teach two methodological “how to” lessons. (5)
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  1. Teach one unit of at least 6 lessons in each of two Type II objective areas. (24)
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  1. Conduct a Type II demonstration lesson for a classroom. (2)
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  1. Identify at least three general Type II skills that could be added to a regular curriculum unit. (2)
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  1. Develop a scope and sequence chart for Type II training. (12)
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  1. Write at least three original skill strategies for Type II training. (7)
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  1. Identify at least three methodological skills that could be added to a regular curriculum unit. (2)
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  1. Develop an original problem solving activity that incorporates learned Type II skills. (10)
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  1. Assist a child in completing a self-directed, self-selected methodological Type II project. (5)
D. Type III Activities
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  1. Work regularly with at least one child to complete his/her Type III investigation. (20)
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  1. Solicit and evaluate student responses during a Type III intake interview. (2)
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  1. Focus a child’s interests into a manageable Type III project. (2)
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  1. Complete a management plan with a student. (1)
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  1. Provide at least ten suggestions to a child for a Type III project in a given content area. (1)
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  1. Suggest at least three necessary methodological Type II skills that can be used for a given Type III topic. (1)
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  1. Find appropriate reference books for a Type III project. (2)
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  1. Make revision suggestions for developing a Type III project. (1)
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  1. Find appropriate raw data gathering activities with regard to the Type III project. (1)
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  1. Teach students at least one product development technique (film-strip, VCR tape, audio cassette, slide show, overheads, etc.). (4)
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  1. Find a real-world audience for a student’s Type III product. (2)
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  1. Evaluate the quality of a Type III project using the Student Product Assessment Form. (3)
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  1. Teach students/teachers how to write a “light bulb” message. (3)
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  1. Conduct a teacher conference to find regularly scheduled Type III time each week for a given student. (1)
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  1. Find a staff/community mentor for a student pursuing a Type III. (2)
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  1. Organize a Type III fair. (10)
E. Curriculum Modification and Differentiation
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  1. Conduct Textbook Triage with a curriculum unit of your choice. (3)
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  1. Develop a Knowledge Tree for a curriculum unit of your choice. (3)
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  1. Create an Advanced Organizer to explain the activities and objectives for a curriculum unit of your choice. (3)
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  1. Develop an introductory activity to increase student interest and motivation for a curriculum unit. (1)
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  1. Experiment with the use of flexible small group instruction as a technique for addressing individual differences. (5)
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  1. Develop three “telescoped” assignments as a strategy for accommodating individual differences with respect to a given curriculum unit. (5)
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  1. Create a set of one activity interest centers for use with a specific curriculum unit. (2 per center)
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  1. Develop a set of debriefing suggestions for use with a specific curriculum unit. (5)
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  1. Organize Talent Pool class options at the secondary level. (50)
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  1. Read It’s About Time (Starko, 1986) and answer these questions—click here for questions. (10)
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  1. Read Curriculum Compacting: The Complete Guide to Modifying the Regular Curriculum for High Ability Students (Reis, Burns, & Renzulli, 1992) and answer these questions—click here for questions. (14)
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  1. PLANNING GUIDE Prepare a plan that describes your decision making process as you consider all of the components you would need to organize in order to implement the compacting process in your classroom, or with selected students, during this school year. Print out these questions—click here for questions—and provide brief answers to help you plan how you would implement compacting in your classroom. (10)
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  1. STRENGTH FINDING Create a matrix that can be used to list all of the students in your class(es) along the first vertical column. Along the first horizontal row, list all of the subject areas that are measured in the standardized, norm-referenced tests that are used by your school district. For example, some norm-referenced tests provide subtest scores in reading, math, language arts, social studies and science. Using either national or local percentiles, read each student’s subtest scores. Find that subject areas in which the student is achieving above average. Mark these subject areas on the matrix. Do this for all students. The purpose of this assignment is to help you identify which students in your class(es) are most likely to need curriculum compacting (and in which subject areas) during this school year. (3 hours for each set of approximately 20 students.)
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  1. LOCATING PRETESTS Find pretests (or post tests that can be used as pretests) for all of the chapters or units for one subject area at your grade level. You do not need to create these pretests, simply find them and organize them in a file folder or booklet. We have found that most publishers provide adequate pretests in at least reading and math. The purpose of this activity is to help you prepare to implement the compacting process by finding the tools that will help you identify which students have mastered some objectives that you will be required to teach during this school year. (10)
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  1. RECORD KEEPING Find or create two different kinds of record keeping charts that can be used to record students’ pretest scores, by chapter or unit, for each of the objectives tested on the pretests you gathered in Assignment 14. One chart should list all of the students in the class in the first vertical column. All of the objectives in a given unit or chapter should be listed in the first horizontal row. There should be one chart for each unit or chapter in the curriculum or textbook.
    The second kind of chart should be used for individual students. This chart should list the student’s name at the top of the chart. The chart should include each objective (by chapter or unit) that will be tested and a place to record the student’s pretest (and possibly post-test) results. The form can later be used for parent conferences or placed in a student’s cumulative file at the end of the year. A computer database can be used if your textbook series or district office does not already have these record keeping forms available for you. We have samples of these kinds of record keeping charts on this website. The purpose of this activity is to help you organize the compacting process BEFORE it gets started. (3 hours if you locate and find charts that have already been created. 18 hours if you must create your own charts.)
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  1. PRETESTING Administer all of the pretests (in 1-3 sittings sometime early in the school year) that you located in Assignment 14 (above) to one student who seems like a likely candidate for curriculum compacting in that subject area. Score the pretests. Use the record keeping chart (assignment 15) in your textbook series (or create one) to show which objectives in each chapter, or unit, have been mastered by this student prior to instruction. The purpose of this activity to help you decide which objectives in your curriculum can be eliminated for a given student. (12)
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  1. GROUP PRETESTING Complete Assignment 16 for more than one student, or for all students in your class. (3 hours per student)
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  1. ADDITIONAL TEXTS Read a text that provides you with additional information about how to individualize assignments and activities in your classroom. Titles might include the following:
    One at A Time All At Once (Blackburn & Powell,1976)
    Teaching Students to Read Through Their Individual Learning Styles (Carbo, Dunn, & Dunn, 1978)
    Practical Approaches to Individualizing Instruction (Dunn & Dunn, 1972)
    Administering the Individualized Instruction Program (Lewis, 1971)
    Change for Children (Kaplan, Kaplan, Madsen, & Gould, 1980)
    Models of Teaching (Joyce & Weil, 1986)
    Gifted Students in the Regular Classroom (Parke, 1989).
    • Beecher, M. (1996). Developing the gifts and talents of all students in the regular classroom. Mansfield Center, CT: Creative Learning Press.
    • Maker, C. J., & Neilson, A. B. (1996). Curriculum development and teaching strategies for gifted learners (2nd ed.). Austin, TX: Pro-Ed.
    • Reis, S. M., Burns, D. E., & Renzulli, J. S. (1992). Curriculum compacting: The guide to modifying the regular curriculum for high ability students. Mansfield Center, CT: Creative Learning Press.
    • Renzulli, J. S., Leppien, J.H., & Hays, T. S. (2000). The multiple menu model: A practical guide for developing differentiated curriculum. Mansfield Center, CT: Creative Learning Press.
    • Tomlinson, C. A. (1995). How to differentiate instruction in mixed-ability classrooms. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.
    • Tomlinson, C., Kaplan, S., Renzulli, J., Purcell, J., Leppien, J., & Burns, D. (2002). The parallel curriculum: A design to develop and challenge high-ability learners. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.
    • Winebrenner, S. (1992). Teaching gifted kids in the regular classroom. Minneapolis, MN: Free Spirit.After you have read the book, you should prepare a 3-5-page paper that provides a summary, analysis and implications for instruction. The purpose of this assignment is to give you additional and related information that places curriculum compacting within the larger concern of meeting diversified student needs in the classroom. (8 hours per book)
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  1. SHARING YOUR WORK WITH OTHERS Prepare a 15-20 minute videotape in which you discuss your thoughts about curriculum compacting, the way you have used it (or plan to use it) in your classroom, and ideas or tips for teachers who are new to the process. (4)
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  1. INSERVICE TRAINING FOR OTHER TEACHERS Develop an inservice presentation that describes and explains curriculum compacting to an audience. Complete a detailed outline that describes what you will present during this workshop and the order in which you will present this information. Include copies of your original handouts and transparencies. Describe your workshop objectives, the activities that you will conduct and the activities that you will have the audience complete. Describe planned follow-up activities and the means for evaluating the impact of this session. (15)
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  1. REORGANIZING THE CLASSROOM FOR COMPACTING This assignment is most appropriate for classroom teachers who want to give pretests to all students in their classroom.
    Give a chapter or unit pretest to all students in your class (You may complete Assignment 17 as a precursor to this assignment.
    Analyze the pretests scores. Some students have probably already mastered all of the objectives for this chapter or unit before you even started teaching. Some students know a couple of the objectives and some don’t show mastery of any of the objectives. How will you reorganize your instruction for this unit or chapter on the basis of these scores? Will you do any small group teaching? Who will be in each small group? How often, and for how long will you meet with these groups? What will your role be during these small group sessions? What will the other students be doing when you are meeting with these small groups? Could students be doing more than one thing while you are working with the small groups? Will you offer any large group activities on different days or at different times or for different purposes? Will you provide enrichment activities for all students or just for the students who have demonstrated total mastery of all of the chapter or unit objectives? If you do provide enrichment, will it be interest-based? What options will the students have for enrichment?
    The purpose of this assignment is to help you consider the kinds of issues that a teacher must think about before implementing the compacting process. For this assignment you must answer each of the questions above and create a schedule and a room blueprint that explains how you will carryout your plans. The room blueprint will show how the desks, chairs, centers, rugs, kits, etc. will be arranged in your classroom to facilitate the compacting process for your entire classroom. (8)
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  1. ANALYZING STUDENTS’ INTERESTS This assignment is intended for teachers who plan to design and create optional, interest-based enrichment activities in their classroom. An interest inventory that can be used with your students is available in the SEM book, or you may use one of your own. Duplicate the inventory and give it to your students. Tally their responses. Identify the most popular topics. Decide which of these topics lend themselves to independent (individual or small groups of students without constant guidance or direction from the teacher) enrichment activities in the classroom. Decide which topics will be the focus for the development of enrichment activities you might create for your classroom. (5)
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  1. CREATING INTEREST DEVELOPMENT CENTERS This assignment is intended for teachers who plan to create optional, interest-based enrichment activities in their classroom. Read the directions in the Curriculum Compacting book that describe how to create an interest development center. Use these guidelines to create an interest development center, complete with suggestion cards, materials and manipulatives. (15)
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  1. CREATING MINI INTEREST CENTERS This assignment is intended for teachers who plan to create optional, interest-based enrichment activities in their classroom. Read the directions in the Curriculum Compacting book that describe how to create an interest development center. Modify this idea to create 5 minicenters (centers in a shoe box, work jobs, ideas along this line, etc.) These minicenters might suggest or provides materials for only two or three activities rather than the 15-20 activities described in a complete interest development center. Make sure you are creating authentic activities that are challenging, exciting and meaningful. (20)
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  1. CREATING MINICENTERS WITH ACTIVITY BOOKS This assignment is intended for teachers who plan to create optional, interest-based enrichment activities in their classroom. Investigate commercial materials, software, books, etc. that can be used as enrichment activities in the classroom. Order or find some of these materials and use them to create 5 minicenters (centers in a shoe box, work jobs, ideas along this line, etc.) These minicenters might suggest or provides materials for only two or three activities rather than the 15-20 activities described in a complete interest development center. Make sure you are choosing authentic activities that are challenging, exciting and meaningful. (10)
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  1. USING TYPE III INVESTIGATIONS WITH ALL STUDENTS This assignment is intended for teachers who plan to create optional, interest-based enrichment activities in their classroom. Create a quasi-Type III investigation that could be conducted by all students in your classroom. Make sure the Type III involves an investigation of a real-world problem that is of high interest to your students. Write up a plan and a time sequence that describes the topic, the subtopic, the introductory activities, the provisions for raw data gathering, the use of community resources, suggested reference books, suggested methodological Type II training, the problem, the product, and the intended audience. You can use the components mentioned in the previous sentence as subheadings in your plan. The completed plan should be specific enough so that a stranger could follow your plan as a prototype for doing the same investigation with her/his students. (15)
F. Management and Communication Activities
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  1. Edit and produce an enrichment program newsletter. (15)
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  1. Develop a program budget for one year. (6)
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  1. Develop a program brochure. (6)
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  1. Create a weekly TAG program schedule. (3)
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  1. Outline five SEM student orientation lessons. (7)
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  1. Document 10 specific behaviors used to develop program ownership among parents, faculty or administration. (15)
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  1. Develop a set of annual target objectives for the SEM program. (5)
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  1. Write effective and well constructed business letters, memos, and parent/staff notes. (Submit three examples.) (5)
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  1. Photograph the Triad Program in progress.(15)
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  1. Develop a five year plan of action for a new program. (20)
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  1. Plan a teacher workshop on Triad/RDIM/SEM/STD including handouts and transparencies. (10)
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  1. Conduct a parent conference. (2)
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  1. Conduct a program evaluation. (20)
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  1. Write a program grant. (25)
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  1. Organize a Saturday/summer/enrichment cluster program. (50)
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  1. Make a complete collection of program forms and records. (15)
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  1. Find local resources for students with special needs or problems. (8)
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  1. Develop a parent handbook. (20)
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  1. Use commercial graphics to enhance program publications. (2)
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  1. Create and use effective overheads for one or more inservice presentations. (7)
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  1. Create a Triad Bulletin Board. (5)
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  1. Compile a Triad Slide Show. (15)
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  1. Give a program update presentation to the school board. (4)
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  1. Participate in a radio or television talk show.(2)
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  1. Write an effective press release. (1)
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  1. Arrange for presentations of program activities to social and civic organizations. (3)
G. Professional Development
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  1. Subscribe to journals in the field of gifted education. (1)
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  1. Participate in state/national gifted education projects. (Variable)
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  1. Accept speaking engagements regarding talent development and enrichment education. (5)
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  1. Provide relevant reports and records to state and federal agencies. (6)
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  1. Assist local administrators in developing district policies. (8)
H. Additional Activities If you have ideas or suggestions for additional activities, please list them in this section and submit descriptions, along with a time credit estimate on the “Contract for Competencies Documentation” form.
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Click to download Contract_for_Competencies (Microsoft Word document) and save this file to your computer’s hard drive. Complete this file and e-mail it back to Mary Sullivan as an attachment.